Here at Urban Spirit, we have seen it all when it comes to cocktails and other bar drinks, having seen our fair share of ‘innovative’ trends. However, as a brand, we need to start abreast of upcoming trends. Believe us, we are still clearing up glitter from the glitter-mad-unicorn-bonanza that was 2017!

This week, we have been seeing an awful lot of seaweed featured in recipes across the country. So, we decided to dig  little deeper as to why.

Salt substitute

One of the main reasons we are seeing this item make its way into our bars and our glasses is because of its qualities. Being immensely salty, the ingredient is being used as a substitute for actual table salt. As a staple feature of many of the cocktail classics, seaweed is now being used in many modern takes on the following drinks:

  • Margarita
  • Tequila Slammer
  • Egg Nog
  • Bloody Mary

And, it’s not just seaweed that’s swimming into our cocktails. Around the world, mixologists are trying to get salt flavours into drinks through various means.

From salt water to squid ink, it seems we are just dipping our toes in the water with seaweed here in Britain.

The spirits Editor of Wine Enthusiast Magazine, Kara Newman, recently passed comment on the trend.

“There’s an increased willingness to experiment. Salt adds a really subtle accent that sets your mouth watering and makes you want to have another sip.”

The Dark and Nori

Combining traditional alcohol flavours with the taste of the ocean, this cocktail is truly unique. This drink is the brainchild of Jordan Link; a gentleman that world in a top American chef, Harold Dieterle.

Offering a fresh/salty take on the popular drink ‘Dark and Stormy’, we urge you to give it a go! To create the drink, you will need the following:

Soju infused with seaweed (Soju is a Korean distilled spirit)
Muddled cucumber
Ginger syrup
Lemon juice
Ginger beer
Angostura bitters

Combining the ingredients (over the course of two days), Link garnishes the drink with seaweed-wrapped cucumber. Justifying the addition of seaweed, he says:

“It adds salinity to the mix. The sweetness, tartness and saltiness of the drink make it balanced and refreshing.”

Let us know what you think; would you give the Dark and Nori a go?